Traditional VS Online MBA Programs

Business school provides a path that allows you to follow your passion and advance (or recreate) your career, while gaining important leadership skills. And diversity, bringing unique ideas, experiences, and perspectives to the MBA classroom, is integral to the rich fabric of this invaluable business school experience.

Diversity in the classroom better prepares all students to compete in a multiethnic and multiracial global marketplace. It is also a key priority for employers across the country targeting business schools with diverse student bodies.

All of that is good news for minority candidates. Yet while many top business schools strive to drive minority applications and corporate recruiters clamor for a diverse group of graduates, African American, Hispanic, and Native American enrollment remains significantly underrepresented. This underrepresentation can be attributed, in part, to a lack of role models in both business and academia, a concern also often raised by women.

Furthermore, like many women, minorities often gravitate toward careers such as medicine or law, which they see as making a positive contribution to society (as shown by a recent study citing underrepresented minorities comprising 13 percent of law students and 12 percent of medical students). compared to just six percent mba at top business schools). At the same time, some minorities attribute their hesitation to pursue an MBA to worrying about not fitting the “business school mold.”

Motivation, Commitment and Leadership Potential

The truth is that there is no “typical type of MBA” that you should fit into, regardless of the stereotypes that have evolved over the years. According to a study by the US Department of Education, business school students studying in the United States are more diverse than any other graduate program.

And there is no undergraduate major, business background, or extracurricular achievement common to all MBAs. (That’s not to say you won’t need quantitative and analytical skills for business school. But you can always take courses like calculus, statistics, or economics to achieve competitive scores on your entrance exams, and subsequently do well in the core.) curriculum of your MBA program.)

There is also no common career goal or industry that all MBAs have set their sights on. Rather, business school students represent a wide range of backgrounds, from sales, consulting, and nonprofit organizations to engineering, marketing, and research analysts.